Pleurothallis “fuzzipetala”

I was sold this plant ten-plus years ago by Helene Gendel of Briggs Hill Orchids, and it was a NoID Pleurothallis which I was told resembles P. restrepioides but is NOT restrepioides. If any of you recognizes this species, please let me know what you think it is. Note that this differs from restrepioides by the narrow, hairy petals and the cupped labellum.

Pleurothallis "fuzzipetala"

Pleurothallis “fuzzipetala”


Pleurothallis "fuzzipetala"

Pleurothallis “fuzzipetala”

The whole plant, in a one gallon pot:
pleurothallis04

What lies ahead for 2016

I’m not sure what to do with this blog now. For the past eight months I’ve gradually been selling off my Nepenthes collection – well, the hybrids mostly – and adding other plants to create some diversity in the greenhouse. A lot of old school Cattleyas have found their way to me, and a wide range of small-to-miniature orchid species of other genera are finding a home in my space as well. 

The Nepenthes project, now five years long, has been a great adventure and I’ve learned a lot. But I feel it’s now time to let go of this monoculture and embrace something new; I crave color and fragrance that Nepenthes don’t offer. One of the less thrilling things I’ve learned during my time with the genus is that most of the Nepenthes mature into rank, weedy plants that tend to outgrow their space and can produce four feet of vines – or more – in a year. It quickly turns into a case of Too Much of A Good Thing. 

So, I don’t know what’s left to share with you. I may retire this blog, or I may write a summary document to collate my experience and distill it into a kind of How To Grow Nepenthes resource. We shall see.

At any rate – best wishes for a bright, healthy and fun-filled 2016!